How People With Relationship Issues Consume Media

Folks who have trouble with romantic relationships may use movies and television as a way to experience what they have trouble with in real life. A new study suggests that those with attachment issues are more likely to be engaged in the stories of the media they consume. Meaning they feel more connected to the characters and think about they, the viewer, would do in the characters’ situations.

The results further suggest this provides a consequence free space in which to deal with relationships issues.

The study examined a little over one thousand Americans eighteen or older. It examined to facets of attachment in romantic relationships—avoidance an anxiety. Those who score high in avoidance tend to keep an emotional distance from their partners. Those who score high in anxiety are what we colloquially refer to as “needy”. In other words, they need constant validation their partner cares about them.

The participants also answered lots of questions about how they engage with the media they consume. Without much surprise, those who scored highly in avoidance, but low in anxiety felt very little connection to the characters and their problems. According to researchers, they treat the characters as they do people in their real lives. So then, those who scored high in anxiety were strongly connected to the stories and characters from their media consumption.

Most interesting were those that scored high in both avoidance and anxiety. They were the most absorbed with the stories and characters in the media they consumed. They made comments saying that the media helped them understand people they weren’t familiar with. That they imagined the outcomes of different choices the characters could have made. That they liked to imagine they new the characters personally.

Buckeyes Discover New Material That Could Revolutionize Electronics

A Buckeye research squad has come up with a possibly revolutionary way to simplify how electronics work—that is a different way for them to use electrons. The simplification comes in the form of a singular material that can do the jobs usually handled by two different materials. Their research was published in “Natural Materials”.

These findings could mean a total rethinking on how electronic engineers build most of the electronic devices in our lives. This could be a solar cell or the light diodes in your TV. It could be transistors in a laptop. It could the sensors that detect light in your smartphone’s camera.

These basic little parts are the key stone of what makes electronics work. Electrons all have a negative charge and depending on how these little parts manipulate each electron they will either absorb energy or radiate it. Holes or the lack of an electron have positive charges. So, all the little parts make electronics work by moving electrons and holes in such a way that electricity is conducted in such a way as to make the device function has planned.

Up until now though each part of on any device could only hold electrons or holes, never both. Traditional electronics have unilaterally needed layers of parts made of different materials to get all the jobs done.

Now with the new-found material NaSn2As2 the need for multiple layers may be a thing of the past, as this crystal can hold electrons and holes. Simplifying any system usually means faster functionality and less breaking down—this is a potential revolution in electronics.

E-Cigarette Advertising Frighteningly Effective on Teenage Boys, New Study Finds

It seems “fake news” style ads being employed by e-cigarette companies can be fairly effective among young people.

Currently the FDA requires large warnings about the addictive chemical nicotine present in e-cigarette products. Before that law went into effect, e-cigarette company Blu took advantage of the idea and the space on its packaging by including a fake warning; the warning mimics almost exactly similar warnings on cigarette packing and the warnings now in effect on e-cigarette products.

The messages featured the large print, all capital word IMPORTANT. Following this were slogans such as “contains flavor” or “less harmful to your wallet” followed. Below the “fake” warnings were actual warnings about the product contents.

A new study by Ohio State University faculty, published in the journal “Tobacco Control”, found that these fake warning messages stuck with teenage boys who viewed them.
In the study which used the fake warnings from Blu’s Something Better marketing campaign, twenty-seven percent said the fake warning was what they remembered most from the packaging. As stunning nineteen percent could even repeat the fake warning slogans with accuracy.

These same teens had much lower odds of being able to recall the true warnings about the product contents and health risks compared to boys who looked at other e-cigarette package based marketing. All packaging and advertising viewed used the smaller, real warning at the bottom of the ad or packaging.

While current law would prohibit a copy cat campaign by any e-cigarette product, the study does reveal how powerful marketing can be when it comes to tobacco and related products and young people and could inform future policy on advertising such products to young people.

Electric Bandages Defeat Infection, New Study Finds

Medical science has known for years that bandages with electrical currents running through them can heal wounds faster than regular bandages or even antibiotics, but no one knew why. However, recent research at OSU is giving us new insight about why this is true and the findings have the potential to lead to advanced wound treating science.

Bandages such as these will belong in a subsection of therapy known as electroceuticals. As one expects, this simply means using electrical impulses to treat medical problems.
Published in the journal called Scientific Reports, the study is the first of its kind. Though the technology has been around since about 2013, it is only now we are starting to understand why electroceutical bandages kill bacteria around a wound, causing faster healing.

Small communities of microorganisms, biofilms (which can include bacteria), live on skin and on the surface of wounds. These biofilms use extracellular polymeric substances to protect themselves; these are fats and proteins that create a protective barrier for the colony that protect if from something like antibiotics. Traditional methods of healing do little to defeat these colonies around wounds, preventing healing.

The outcome of the study demonstrated that electroceutical bandages, when made from the correct materials, destroy these EPS films that protect the bacterial colonies.

Medical science has known for years that bandages with electrical currents running through them can heal wounds faster than regular bandages or even antibiotics, but no one knew why. However, recent research at OSU is giving us new insight about why this is true and the findings have the potential to lead to advanced wound treating science.
Bandages such as these will belong in a subsection of therapy known as electroceuticals. As one expects, this simply means using electrical impulses to treat medical problems.
Published in the journal called Scientific Reports, the study is the first of its kind. Though the technology has been around since about 2013, it is only now we are starting to understand why electroceutical bandages kill bacteria around a wound, causing faster healing.
Small communities of microorganisms, biofilms (which can include bacteria), live on skin and on the surface of wounds. These biofilms use extracellular polymeric substances to protect themselves; these are fats and proteins that create a protective barrier for the colony that protect if from something like antibiotics. Traditional methods of healing do little to defeat these colonies around wounds, preventing healing.
The outcome of the study demonstrated that electroceutical bandages, when made from the correct materials, destroy these EPS films that protect the bacterial colonies.

Counseling Reduces Cancer Recurrence, Says New Study

Breast cancer patients, two years after receiving diagnosis, have quadrupled their positive thoughts regarding the changes their bodies have gone through due to their illness, according to a new study.

Survivors who attended mentoring or counseling services designed specifically for cancer patients were found to have even more positive life changes. This particular study examined 160 women (all either had been diagnosed with stage 2 or 3 breast cancer) and were all treated in the Columbus area.

All the survivors who participated were part of the Immunity and stress Breast Cancer Program that looked into how effective counseling and intervention programs, designed by OSU, to help cancer patients handle the hurdles of their conditions and if counseling lowered the recurrence risks.

Previous research by the program had shown such programs did in fact reduce such risks.