OSU Researches Study Our Ability To Recognize Emotions in Facial Expression

A fascinating new study by researchers at OSU has found that people can correctly identify another person’s feelings with 75% accuracy based only little changes in blood flow color around the nose, eyebrows, cheeks and chin.

The new research allowed scientists to construct computer programs that accurately recognize emotions using the same parameters of blood flow coloration with 90% accuracy. The newly documented research on the connection between the central nervous system and emotion expression in human faces was published in the Proceedings of the National Academy of Sciences.

Researchers see their work being used in the field of AI, hoping that it will allow machine learning programs to recognize and maybe even emulate human emotion–towards this end they are patenting their own algorithms. They have also found a way to commercialize the research through their spin-off company, Online Emotion.

 

Buckeyes Host Ohio’s Severe Weather Awareness Week

The Ohio State Meteorology Club sponsored the 22nd Annual Severe Weather Symposium last week. The symposium finds meteorologists from all across the country and from many specialties  to give presentations, but also to interact with students interested in the field.

Guest speakers included Cory Mottice, who is a forecaster for the National Weather Service office in Cleveland, Ohio. Another speaker, Jeff Logsdon, is a science and operations officer for the National Weather Service in Northern Indiana. They also invited WTVG Chief Meteorologist Jay Berschback.

While lots of topics were covered, the most discussed  were severe weather issues. These issue included the unusual outbreak of tornadoes in Ohio in 2017 as well as the impact of hurricanes Harvey and Irma.

Mr. Logsdon focused his discussion on two issues. First the very powerful tornado that crossed 39 miles from Indiana to Ohio. He also talked about the historic flooding that ravaged Indiana last year.

OSU Biomedical Engineers 3D Print Replacement Heart Valves

Physicians at The Ohio State University Wexner Medical Center are taking an innovative approach to improve care for patients receiving aortic valve replacements. They’re working alongside biomedical engineers from Ohio State’s College of Engineering, who have developed a way to model and predict potential complications so they can be avoided.

The most common reason the aortic valve needs to be replaced is aortic stenosis, or narrowing of the valve opening. Over decades, the valve leaflets can become stiff from calcification, making it harder to pump blood from the left ventricle into the aorta. There are two options to replace the diseased valve – open heart surgery through a traditional opening of the chest, or a less invasive transcatheter method that deploys a tissue (bioprosthetic) valve through a blood vessel in the leg.

To help decide which approach and which valve is right for each patient, physicians and biomedical engineers at Ohio State do something unique: They create personalized 3D models of the aortic valve and neighboring structures and simulate how the new valve will function. This group meets weekly to decide together what will be best for the patient.

The team, which includes graduate students from biomedical and mechanical engineering, precisely reconstruct a patient’s aorta and 3D print it from the patient’s CT scan using various flexible materials that mimic the real aorta. They load the model into a heart simulator which pumps transparent, simulated blood through the system.

OSU Studies if Cleaner Beaches Would Help Americans

Cleaning up beaches could boost local economies in addition to preserving natural treasures and animal habitats.

In southern California’s Orange County alone, the economic benefits of beach cleanup could range from $13 per resident in a three-month period if debris were reduced by 25 percent to $42 per resident with a 75 percent drop in plastics and other trash along the oceanfront, according to a new study. That could mean up to a $46 million boost to the county’s economy in just one summer.

This is the first study to compare the amount of ocean debris with the behavior of beachgoers and to calculate an economic benefit to cleaning up those beaches, said Tim Haab, a professor of agricultural, environmental and development economics at The Ohio State University.

To come up with an estimated benefit, Haab and his co-authors embarked on a two-part study, which appears online in the journal Marine Resource Economics. The work was done in collaboration with the National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration’s marine debris program.

OSU Researches Study Where and When People “Clean Their Plates”

When people eat at home, there’s typically not much left on their plates – and that means there’s likely less going to landfills, according to new research from The Ohio State University.

The same people who on average left just 3 percent of their food on their plates when choosing their own meals left almost 40 percent behind when given a standard boxed-lunch type of meal. Plate waste at home was 3.5 percent higher when diners went for seconds (or thirds).

What we leave behind on our plates is the primary focus of efforts to reduce food waste, and this study shows that it’s potentially more important to concentrate on other conservation measures at home, including using up food before it spoils, said Brian Roe, the study’s lead author and a professor of agricultural, environmental and development economics at Ohio State.

Prior research typically has focused on “plate waste” in settings such as school cafeterias and buffets and has found much greater waste — from about 7 percent at an all-you-can-eat pizza buffet to 18 percent waste of French fries at an all-you-can-eat university dining hall.

The new study, published in the journal PLOS ONE, is the first of its kind to follow adult eaters through their normal day-to-day eating patterns, said Roe, who leads the Ohio State Food Waste Collaborative.