Playing in the Dirt: New Research Reveals Much About Soil and Climate Change

New research from the Ohio State University developed a new understanding about microbes and viruses in Sweden’s thawing permafrost. This new information may help scientists predict that speed at which climate change will occur.

The major players are the microbes whose control over climate change is based on their consumption or production of methane. The new set of studies from Buckeye scientists increased our understanding of these microbes.

Many of these bacterial consumers, as the study calls them, and the viruses that interact with them have never-before even been identified. While it was known to scientists that thawing permafrost would release methane, they didn’t know much about specifics of the process, nor how microbial colonies contribute to the process.

Researchers stated that as the world becomes more warm, and more wet we will need to be able to predict who things will change. So, we need to know how this microbes work. They also stated, generally speaking, knowing more about what is going on in the soil can only be a good thing.

The research was published in Nature, Nature Microbiology and ISME Journal.