Are Our Brains Pre-Wired to See Language? A New Study Suggests, Yes, It Is.

New research has found that humans are born with a part of the brain that is wired already to see words and letters, setting the ground work for reading.

Looking at brain scans from newborns, scientists found that the part of the brain, the visual word form area” or VWFA is connected to the language part of the brain. Researchers say this makes it fertile ground to develop a sense of visual words. Even before exposure to language.

The VWFA is specializes in this way for reading only as individuals that are becoming literate. Some scientists thought that the VWFA only became receptive to language when exposed to it. Like the parts of the brain that sees faces, scenes or other objects as babies learn about them.

Researchers found this wasn’t true though that the VWFA comes out formed to be receptive to language.

Researchers found the VWFA was different because of its functional connection to the language part of the brain and comes preprogrammed unlike the way the visual cortex develops facial recognition.

OSU Researchers Uncover Positive News About Brain Tissue and Concussions

New research at the Ohio State University reveals details about sub-cellular change in the brain in a post-concussive state that might one day be used to provide better treatment to concussion sufferers and other patients with brain damage.

Researchers examined the changes in rodent brains when affected by laboratory induced mild traumatic brain injury. They found rapid microscopic swelling along the axons. The axons are the long, slender part of the nerve cell that sends vital messages to other parts of the brain. This same kind of swelling is also seen in Alzheimer’s and Parkinson’s patients.

There is some guarded good news, though—the swollen axons are reversible. It remains, however, unclear how exactly all this plays out in a human brain and the degree to which people may respond differently to brain trauma and other neurological problems.