Researchers Illuminate the Importance of Making New Friends in College

A new study, co-authored by Ohio State faculty, has found that friendships developed during the first year of college can be life-long and help students become adults who have bridged cultural divides and develop broader worldviews. Researchers believe this important aspect of the first-year experience will help future generations embrace their differences and come together.

One hundred some students of varying races and religions answered questions about how their close friendships with those who had different religious traditions, political ideas, different cultural backgrounds etc. influenced their outlooks on those with different world views than themselves.

Researchers said that previous studies had proven that the most important factor in a successful college career was a positive learning experience with faculty. The second indicator, more important than learning, graduation rates and economic gains, has been a good relationship with peers. Researchers say their new study illuminates the powerful outcomes of these positive peer relationships.

When first-year students arrive at college, they are typically open to making new friends. This is especially true if they are leaving home for the first time and/or don’t know anyone at their college already.

The college experience is unique in that it places people of different beliefs in a situation where they are spending a lot of time together and living closely with one another.
The study found that 64% of students who had no interworldview friendships when they began college—interworldview friendship is what researchers are calling those friendships with people of different beliefs or cultures—made at least one interworldview friend the first year. 20% of this group claimed to have made five or more interworldview friendships by the end of their first year.

Researchers believe these kinds of peer relationships are absolutely essential to the college experience and that the benefits are measurably positive.

New Study Finds Watching College Football Socially May Be Mental Health Boon

College football fans may get a boost in their self-esteem when a team wins a game. The boost could last up to two days, according to new research. While the loosing side may see a decrease in mood, they won’t suffer any self-esteem loss. Both sides may see benefits when they watch games with friends.

The study examined 174 students from OSU and Michigan State after an essential game that took place 21 Nov. 2019. Michigan bested OSU 17-14 in this contest.

The participants were asked many questions about their mental health and relaxation activities. The wide range of questions kept students from suspecting the purpose of the study. Before game time, both sides were rated similarly on self-esteem. Sunday after the game Michigan students rated much higher on self-esteem, and this went up even higher when they were tested Monday. The Buckeye students had very little measurable difference.

The study found that students on both sides experienced the most positive results if they experienced the game as a social activity, regardless of victory or loss.

 

OSU: More Access to Higher Education for Low-Income Students

The American Talent Initiative, a collaborative of 30 founding colleges and universities, seeks to increase the number of low-income students at up to 270 of America’s top-performing institutions by 50,000 by 2025. The Ohio State University is a founding member of the collaborative.

Each founding institution has agreed to a renewed focus on enrolling, supporting and graduating additional low- and moderate-income students. Importantly, the institutions have also committed to sharing what they learn about making progress toward their goals with one another and with the broader higher education community and public.

Over the next decade, the American Talent Initiative plans to expand to a total of up to 270 schools that consistently graduate at least 70 percent of their students in six years or fewer. To reach the goal of 50,000 additional low- and moderate-income students among those colleges by 2025, the American Talent Initiative hopes to recruit 10,000 by 2020 and 25,000 by 2022.

Ohio State University President Michael V. Drake, an American Talent Initiative Steering Committee member, says the initiative will give thousands of students who believe higher education is beyond their reach the chance to attend the college of their dreams.

Five Buckeyes watched by Maxwell FB Club

Jody Victor: Here is some great Buckeye football news from OSU.edu and OhioStateBuckeyes.com.

COLUMBUS, Ohio – The Maxwell Football Club, presenters of the prestigious Maxwell Award and the Bednarik Award, announced its initial 2013 watch lists for each award today and five Ohio State Buckeyes are under consideration:

Junior quarterback Braxton Miller (Maxwell Award watch list);
Senior running back Carlos Hyde (Maxwell Award);
Senior safety C.J. Barnett (Bednarik Award watch list);
Junior cornerback Bradley Roby (Bednarik Award); and
Junior linebacker Ryan Shazier (Bednarik Award).

The Maxwell Award, named in honor of Robert W. “Tiny” Maxwell, has been given to America’s College Player of the Year since 1937. The Bednarik Award has been presented to the College Defensive Player of the Year since 1995.

Semifinalists for the Maxwell and Bednarik Awards will be announced Oct. 29, while the three finalists for each award will be unveiled Nov. 18. The winners of the 2013 Maxwell and Bednarik Awards will be announced as part of the Home Depot ESPNU College Football Awards Show held on Dec. 5. The formal presentations of these awards will be made at the Maxwell Football Club Awards Gala hosted by Harrah’s Entertainment Atlantic City on March 7, 2014.

The watch list candidates have been chosen by the Maxwell Football Club’s selection committee, which analyzes both past performance and future potential.

GO BUCKS GO BUCKS GO BUCKS

Jody Victor

Gotham Classic Schedule Set

Jody Victor: Here is some great Buckeye basketball news from OSU.edu and OhioStateBuckeyes.com.

PRINCETON, N.J. – National men’s college basketball powers Notre Dame and Ohio State highlight the field of the second annual Gotham Classic.

Joining the Fighting Irish and Buckeyes in the 2013 Gotham Classic are Bryant, Delaware, and North Dakota State.

Notre Dame and Ohio State will tip-off against each other for only the 13th time in history when they meet on Saturday, December 21 at Madison Square Garden in New York City. Ohio State holds a 7-5 series advantage with the two having last met in December of 2008. Notre Dame and Ohio State have combined for 58 NCAA Tournament appearances. ESPN2 will televise the Showcase Game.

TICKET INFORMATION: Tickets for the Gotham Classic doubleheader featuring Notre Dame vs. Ohio State at Madison Square Garden on December 21 are on sale now and may be purchased by calling Ticketmaster at 866-448-7849 or through Ticketmaster.com.

GO BUCKS GO BUCKS GO BUCKS

Jody Victor