New Buckeyes Program for Teachers

The Ohio State University is disclosing another arrangement to support magnificence in instructing at the college.

On Thursday, President Michael V. Drake and Executive Vice President and Provost Bruce A. McPheron visited agents from the College of Arts and Sciences to talk about the new Teaching Support Program.

The program, offered through the University Institute for Teaching and Learning, is a deliberate proficient advancement program to give extra help to showing workforce and their work in the classroom. The program is accessible to residency track staff, clinical personnel and teachers.

The program highlights three sections:

• The Teaching Practices Inventory, a self-guided review requesting that employees examine their very own course learning objective, assignments, testing and other criteria to give a benchmark to employees as their instructing rehearses advance.

• Teaching@Ohio State, a progression of online modules concentrated on key components of viable educating and a supporting UITL Reading List. The objective is to outfit staff with devices to investigate new methodologies in the classroom.

• A five-year pilot instructional upgrade program requests that employees reexamine how they show courses and utilize the overhaul to assess the effect and viability of their educating.

Every one of the parts of the program includes a fiscal motivating force to support the compensation of the personnel who volunteer. Personnel can gain base-pay increments of somewhere in the range of $400 and $1,200 to finish each piece of the program.

Students with Intellectual Disabilities Not Spending Enough Time in Gen Ed?

In 1975 a national law was created that required students with intellectual disabilities spend as much time as is possible in gen. ed. courses. A new study by OSU researchers has found that progress in that regard has come to a standstill. No other study has examined nation-wide patterns in placement for students with these disabilities for the entire life span of the law, some 40 years.

In this time, 55-73% of students with intellectual disabilities spend nearly their whole day in specialized schools or classrooms instead of with their non-disabled peers.

Researchers used multiple data sources to find out how students between the ages of 6-21 where placed in each federally-reported educational system between 1976 and 2014.
One possibility might be that inclusion has stalled because most students are already placed in the least restrictive educational environment possible, as per the federal law. However, data from multiple states suggests that the issue could be a lack of standardization among school systems on what constitutes the “least restrictive education environment”.

The study will be published in the American Journal on Intellectual Developmental Disabilities.

Ohio State Receives Top Rank for Online Undergraduate Degree Offerings

The Ohio State University’s online bachelor’s programs are America’s best, according to the 2018 rankings released today by U.S. News & World Report. In addition, the university’s online graduate nursing program is ranked No. 2.

The rankings include public and private colleges and universities with degree-granting programs offering online classes needed to complete the degree. Categories include bachelor’s programs and graduate programs in business, information technology, criminal justice, education, engineering and nursing.

Most undergraduate programs assessed by U.S. News are degree completion programs, and so few, if any, new students are first-time, first-year students. Consequently, indicators like standardized test scores and high school class rankings that are used by the publication to rank brick-and-mortar colleges are not used to rank online programs. Instead, programs are rated on graduate indebtedness, course delivery and academic and career support made available to students remotely.

Ohio State’s rankings are:
No. 1, best online bachelor’s programs (out of 357 programs)
No. 2, best online nursing program (out of 159 programs)
No. 23 (tie), best online engineering programs (out of 93 programs)
No. 157 (tie), best education programs (out of 309 programs)

OSU Studies Folks Who “Trust Their Gut”

People who tend to trust their intuition or to believe that the facts they hear are politically biased are more likely to stand behind inaccurate beliefs, a new OSU study suggests. And those who rely on concrete evidence to form their beliefs are less likely to have misperceptions about high-profile scientific and political issues.

Previous research has shown connections between belief in conspiracy theories and education level, religious fundamentalism and party affiliation. In this study, a belief that truth is political was the strongest predictor of whether someone would buy into conspiracy theories. Garrett also found that those who rely on intuition to assess the truth had a stronger tendency to endorse conspiracies.

They examined data from three nationally representative surveys that included anywhere from 500 to almost 1,000 participants. Their aim was to better understand how people form their beliefs and how that might contribute to their willingness to accept ideas with little or no evidence to support them.

The researchers compared how participants’ approach to deciding what is true was related to their beliefs about hot-button topics. The study included questions about the debunked link between vaccines and autism and the science-based connection between human activity and climate change.

The researchers evaluated survey respondents’ tendency to agree with seven well-known conspiracy theories. More than 45 percent said they didn’t buy that John F. Kennedy was murdered by Lee Harvey Oswald alone; 33 percent agreed that the U.S. government was behind the assassination of Martin Luther King Jr. and 32 percent said Princess Diana’s death was orchestrated by the British royal family.

However, researchers said it’s important to acknowledge that our beliefs aren’t based solely upon political predispositions.

Jody Victor: New Study at OSU Finds Kids Notice What Adult’s Miss

Although adults can beat children at most cognitive tasks, new research shows that children’s limitations can sometimes be their strength.

In two studies, researchers found that adults were very good at remembering information they were told to focus on, and ignoring the rest. In contrast, 4- to 5-year-olds tended to pay attention to all the information that was presented to them – even when they were told to focus on one particular item. That helped children to notice things that adults didn’t catch because of the grownups’ selective attention.

The results have important implications for understanding how education environments affect children’s learning.

The research was supported by grants from the National Institutes of Health and the National Institute for Educational Science.