The Power of Positivity

According to new research, telling someone who is in distress something very simple, like “I understand why you feel that way,” can actually help people feel better.

During the study participants described something from their real life that had made them angry.

When researchers didn’t show support or understanding for the participants’ anger the participant showed decline in positive emotions. On the other hand, when a researcher validated the anger the participants were saying their positive emotions seemed to stay the same.

Study participants also reported dips in their entire mood as they retold the event that had angered them. Only those who were validated reported feeling any recovery in good mood.

There was no notable difference found in participants negative emotions. Researchers say this speaks to how powerful focusing on protecting positivity can be.

While it is really important to help people experiencing anxiety, fear or depression but the practice can also help people explore positive emotions such as love, flexibility, optimism or curiosity.

 

OSU Researches Study Our Ability To Recognize Emotions in Facial Expression

A fascinating new study by researchers at OSU has found that people can correctly identify another person’s feelings with 75% accuracy based only little changes in blood flow color around the nose, eyebrows, cheeks and chin.

The new research allowed scientists to construct computer programs that accurately recognize emotions using the same parameters of blood flow coloration with 90% accuracy. The newly documented research on the connection between the central nervous system and emotion expression in human faces was published in the Proceedings of the National Academy of Sciences.

Researchers see their work being used in the field of AI, hoping that it will allow machine learning programs to recognize and maybe even emulate human emotion–towards this end they are patenting their own algorithms. They have also found a way to commercialize the research through their spin-off company, Online Emotion.

 

Want to “rebound” from failure?

If you want to “rebound” from failure, focus on your emotions, not your failure, says new OSU study.

Researchers found that people who just thought about a failure tended to make excuses for why they were unsuccessful and didn’t try harder when faced with a similar situation. In contrast, people who focused on their emotions following a failure put forth more effort when they tried again.

While thinking about how to improve from past mistakes might help – this study didn’t examine that – the researchers found that people who reflect on a failure do not tend to focus on ways to avoid a similar mistake. When asked to think about their mistakes, most people focus on protecting their ego. They think about how the failure wasn’t their fault, or how it wasn’t that big of a deal, anyway.

Researchers stated that in most real-life situations, people probably have both cognitive and emotional responses to their failures. But the important thing to remember is not to avoid the emotional pain of failing, but to use that pain to fuel improvement.