Public Health Experts Against Vaping Bans

According to a group of experts, including the lead author of a paper published in “Science” Amy Fairchild (dean of Public Health at OSU), knee-jerk bans on e-cigarette sales could do more harm than good. They fear such bans will take away an important tool that does help adults quit smoking.

In their paper the authors point out that the recent illnesses and deaths appear to be linked to vaping black market THC oils and this should concern us along with the rise of young people vaping nicotine. But these problems cannot all be lumped together.

Limiting access and appeal among the less harmful vaping products and leaving deadly, traditional tobacco products on the market does nothing to protect public health, according to the authors. Doing so could threaten a trend that might be leading to the demise of cigarettes.

In the wake of injuries and deaths related to vaping policymakers including the American Medical Association have favored blanket bans—either banning all vaping products or those with flavors. The authors believe policy should be shaped using all available data and that there are important distinctions to be made between nicotine and THC products as well as commercial and black-market products.

 

How Moms and Dads Influence Their Adult Children’s Health

A new study at OSU found that some adults see their fathers and mothers pretty differently when it comes to how their parents influenced their health.

These researchers found by interviewing 45 married couples that mothers are likely to influence their adult children’s health in a similar way throughout their entire lives; by being involved and available when their children are in a crisis of health.

Dad had a pretty different role when it came to influencing their adult children’s health—they were most helpful by demonstrating to their adult children what not to do when it came to staying healthy.

Because there are few studies of this kind, the researchers decided that in-depth interviews where the best way to determine what topics were of highest concern to adult children when it came to health and their parents influence. They even asked the couples about the influence their in-laws might have on their health.

The majority of participants did not claim or perceive that their parents or in-laws had much impact on their health (either in a positive or negative manner—these folks claimed that they set pretty strict boundaries with in-laws and even their own parents. They mostly claimed that their marital relationship was prioritized when it came to health influence.

However, dependent on the issue, up to a quarter to a bit more than one third of the participants did feel parents or even their in-laws had an impact. The study also suggested that the gender of the participant had no important effects on the way participants perceived the influence of fathers and mothers on their health.

Again, the research suggests that when there was influence mothers had a positive influence by helping their ill adult children and fathers tended to serve as role models of what not to do to maintain good health.

Electric Bandages Defeat Infection, New Study Finds

Medical science has known for years that bandages with electrical currents running through them can heal wounds faster than regular bandages or even antibiotics, but no one knew why. However, recent research at OSU is giving us new insight about why this is true and the findings have the potential to lead to advanced wound treating science.

Bandages such as these will belong in a subsection of therapy known as electroceuticals. As one expects, this simply means using electrical impulses to treat medical problems.
Published in the journal called Scientific Reports, the study is the first of its kind. Though the technology has been around since about 2013, it is only now we are starting to understand why electroceutical bandages kill bacteria around a wound, causing faster healing.

Small communities of microorganisms, biofilms (which can include bacteria), live on skin and on the surface of wounds. These biofilms use extracellular polymeric substances to protect themselves; these are fats and proteins that create a protective barrier for the colony that protect if from something like antibiotics. Traditional methods of healing do little to defeat these colonies around wounds, preventing healing.

The outcome of the study demonstrated that electroceutical bandages, when made from the correct materials, destroy these EPS films that protect the bacterial colonies.

Medical science has known for years that bandages with electrical currents running through them can heal wounds faster than regular bandages or even antibiotics, but no one knew why. However, recent research at OSU is giving us new insight about why this is true and the findings have the potential to lead to advanced wound treating science.
Bandages such as these will belong in a subsection of therapy known as electroceuticals. As one expects, this simply means using electrical impulses to treat medical problems.
Published in the journal called Scientific Reports, the study is the first of its kind. Though the technology has been around since about 2013, it is only now we are starting to understand why electroceutical bandages kill bacteria around a wound, causing faster healing.
Small communities of microorganisms, biofilms (which can include bacteria), live on skin and on the surface of wounds. These biofilms use extracellular polymeric substances to protect themselves; these are fats and proteins that create a protective barrier for the colony that protect if from something like antibiotics. Traditional methods of healing do little to defeat these colonies around wounds, preventing healing.
The outcome of the study demonstrated that electroceutical bandages, when made from the correct materials, destroy these EPS films that protect the bacterial colonies.

Coalition of Researchers From Multiple Disciplines Fight Algal Blooms in Ohio

At the Ohio State University scientists and other experts are working together to create solutions to potential health problems and commercial concerns associated with harmful algal blooms in our local lakes and around the world.

The HABRI or Harmful Algal Bloom Research Initiative is a statewide response to the unwanted blooms, which was established in 2014 by the Ohio Department of High Education. Eight other colleges and universities participate in the group.

Some of the OSU participants include: Jiyoung Lee who is looking into reducing microcystins (blue-green algae) in both water treatment plants and lake water; Allison MacKay is developing guidelines for cost-effective water testing and treatment; Stuart Ludsin is developing methods to help state agencies measure the amount of microcystins in local fish populations and guide and inform people about safe amounts of fish to consume during HAB season; and Greg LaBarge is working with 56 farmers in the western Lake Erie basin to collect data about the effects of crop selection, irrigation and soil management on phosphorus/nutrient runoff and its effect on HABs.

Ohio State Researchers Study Self Control

In a new study researchers observed people’s hands, in real time, struggle over the choice between a long-term goal and short-term temptation. This work represents a new way to study self-control.

In an experiment, participants viewed pictures of a healthy and an unhealthy food choice on opposite sides of the top of a computer screen and moved a cursor from the center bottom to select one of the foods.

People who moved the cursor closer to the unhealthy treat (even when they ultimately made the healthy choice) later showed less self-control than did those who made a more direct path to the healthy snack.

The results may shed light on a scholarly debate about what’s happening in the brain when humans harness willpower. But for those with higher levels of self-control, the path to the healthy food was more direct, indicating that they experienced less conflict. The findings also offer new evidence in a debate about how decision-making in self-control situations unfolds, researchers said.