Coalition of Researchers From Multiple Disciplines Fight Algal Blooms in Ohio

At the Ohio State University scientists and other experts are working together to create solutions to potential health problems and commercial concerns associated with harmful algal blooms in our local lakes and around the world.

The HABRI or Harmful Algal Bloom Research Initiative is a statewide response to the unwanted blooms, which was established in 2014 by the Ohio Department of High Education. Eight other colleges and universities participate in the group.

Some of the OSU participants include: Jiyoung Lee who is looking into reducing microcystins (blue-green algae) in both water treatment plants and lake water; Allison MacKay is developing guidelines for cost-effective water testing and treatment; Stuart Ludsin is developing methods to help state agencies measure the amount of microcystins in local fish populations and guide and inform people about safe amounts of fish to consume during HAB season; and Greg LaBarge is working with 56 farmers in the western Lake Erie basin to collect data about the effects of crop selection, irrigation and soil management on phosphorus/nutrient runoff and its effect on HABs.

Ohio State Researchers Study Self Control

In a new study researchers observed people’s hands, in real time, struggle over the choice between a long-term goal and short-term temptation. This work represents a new way to study self-control.

In an experiment, participants viewed pictures of a healthy and an unhealthy food choice on opposite sides of the top of a computer screen and moved a cursor from the center bottom to select one of the foods.

People who moved the cursor closer to the unhealthy treat (even when they ultimately made the healthy choice) later showed less self-control than did those who made a more direct path to the healthy snack.

The results may shed light on a scholarly debate about what’s happening in the brain when humans harness willpower. But for those with higher levels of self-control, the path to the healthy food was more direct, indicating that they experienced less conflict. The findings also offer new evidence in a debate about how decision-making in self-control situations unfolds, researchers said.

OSU Research Suggest Smoking Bans Help Some Smokers Quit

A new national study shows for the first time how smoking bans in cities, states and counties led young people living in those areas to give up, or never take up, the use of cigarettes.

In particular, the study found that young males who were light smokers before a smoking ban was instituted in their area were more likely to give up cigarettes after a ban went into effect. Smokers who lived in areas where there was never a ban weren’t likely to drop their cigarette habit. Smoking bans did not seem to affect tobacco use among women, although their use was already below that of men.

While other studies have focused on how smoking bans affect smoking rates in areas where they are instituted, this is the first national study to show how the bans affect individual smokers. Results showed that the probability of a young man smoking in the last 30 days was 19 percent for those living in an area without a ban, but only 13 percent for those who live in an area with a ban. For women, the probability was the same (11 percent) regardless of where they lived.

The study was published in the September 2016 issue of the Journal of Health and Social Behavior.

Ohio State to Receive Andrew Heiskell Award for Ethiopia One Health Program

Ohio State University will receive an Andrew Heiskell Honorable Mention Award due to the increasing success of its Ethiopia One Health initiative which includes a partnership with Addis Ababa University, Gondar University among other research facilities in Ethiopia. The goal of the program is to improve health in sub-Saharan Africa. It also provides Ethiopian and Ohio State Students educational opportunities abroad.

The Heiskell Awards honor worthy initiatives in international higher education among the member campuses of the Institute of International Education (IIE).

The Ethiopia One Health initiative is made up of researchers, clinicians and students that address major emerging health threats. These threats include things like cervical cancer, rabies, neonatology, food and environmental quality.

Ohio State’s collaboration with Addis Ababa and Gondar Universities will expand by creating certificate programs, hosting visiting scholars, making e-learning available and adding new course work in related degree programs.

IIE will present the awards at a ceremony in New York City on March 20.

Source: http://oia.osu.edu/news/3706-ohio-state-recognized-nationally-for-ethiopia-one-health-initiative.html