Old Medicine, New Medicine Come Together to Cure Leishmaniasis Disease

Researchers from OSU are planning for first phase of human trials on a new vaccine. They used CRISPR gene editing to change the parasite that causes leishmaniasis. This is a common skin disease in tropical parts of the world and is increasing in the U.S.

Scientists found through a series of animal studies that the vaccine protected mice from the skin disease. Even immune compromised mice who were exposed as human are—through a bite of infected sand flies—were protected from the parasite’s disease.

In a series of animal studies, the vaccine protected mice against the disease – including mice with compromised immune systems and mice exposed to the parasite in the same way humans are, through the bite of infected sand flies.

The researchers stated that if the vaccine can protect against such a direct method of infection that the vaccine may be ready.

The team used a hundred-year-old method from the Middle East called leishmanization. They introduce the live parasite to the skin to create a small infection. After it is healed this small exposure gives the patient lifelong immunity.

Researchers noted that will live vaccines are the most effective can be the most dangerous causing serious disease in some patients. Their vaccine only “infects” the skin with immunity because the vaccine parasites have been genetically manipulated through CRISPR.

 

Electric Bandages Defeat Infection, New Study Finds

Medical science has known for years that bandages with electrical currents running through them can heal wounds faster than regular bandages or even antibiotics, but no one knew why. However, recent research at OSU is giving us new insight about why this is true and the findings have the potential to lead to advanced wound treating science.

Bandages such as these will belong in a subsection of therapy known as electroceuticals. As one expects, this simply means using electrical impulses to treat medical problems.
Published in the journal called Scientific Reports, the study is the first of its kind. Though the technology has been around since about 2013, it is only now we are starting to understand why electroceutical bandages kill bacteria around a wound, causing faster healing.

Small communities of microorganisms, biofilms (which can include bacteria), live on skin and on the surface of wounds. These biofilms use extracellular polymeric substances to protect themselves; these are fats and proteins that create a protective barrier for the colony that protect if from something like antibiotics. Traditional methods of healing do little to defeat these colonies around wounds, preventing healing.

The outcome of the study demonstrated that electroceutical bandages, when made from the correct materials, destroy these EPS films that protect the bacterial colonies.

Medical science has known for years that bandages with electrical currents running through them can heal wounds faster than regular bandages or even antibiotics, but no one knew why. However, recent research at OSU is giving us new insight about why this is true and the findings have the potential to lead to advanced wound treating science.
Bandages such as these will belong in a subsection of therapy known as electroceuticals. As one expects, this simply means using electrical impulses to treat medical problems.
Published in the journal called Scientific Reports, the study is the first of its kind. Though the technology has been around since about 2013, it is only now we are starting to understand why electroceutical bandages kill bacteria around a wound, causing faster healing.
Small communities of microorganisms, biofilms (which can include bacteria), live on skin and on the surface of wounds. These biofilms use extracellular polymeric substances to protect themselves; these are fats and proteins that create a protective barrier for the colony that protect if from something like antibiotics. Traditional methods of healing do little to defeat these colonies around wounds, preventing healing.
The outcome of the study demonstrated that electroceutical bandages, when made from the correct materials, destroy these EPS films that protect the bacterial colonies.

New Study May Help Predict C diff.

A group of elements may help foresee which patients are probably going to create Clostridioides difficile, a possibly dangerous infection regularly known as C. difficile or C. diff, another Buckeye’s study has found.

What’s more, that could help in endeavors to avert disease.

Diminished safe capacity, ongoing anti-microbial utilize, current or late hospitalization and earlier C. difficile contamination anticipated danger of the consequent disease, opening the way to potential preventive efforts.

The examination included investigations in the two people and mice and included the transplant of excrement from human examination members to mice to survey contrasts in helplessness to C. difficile disease and sub-atomic level clarifications for that expanded hazard.

The National Institutes of Health and the Center for Individualized Medicine at Mayo Clinic bolstered the investigation.

Researchers Looking into Medical Application of “atomic bins”.

Scientists have created originator particles that may one day have the capacity to search out and trap fatal nerve operators and other poisons in nature – and perhaps in people.

The researchers, driven by natural scientific experts from The Ohio State University, call these new particles “atomic bins.” As the name suggests, these particles are molded like bins and research in the lab has demonstrated they can discover mimicked nerve specialists, swallow them in their holes and trap them for safe evacuation.

In another examination distributed in Chemistry – An European Journal, the analysts ventured out making adaptations that could have potential for use in drug.

While this early research demonstrated the guarantee of sub-atomic crates in the earth, the researchers needed to check whether they could create comparative structures that could clear nerve operators or different poisons from people.

Buckeye Creates Mobile Invention Studio to Support Would-Be Inventors

On the campus of OSU, in the main lobby of the James Cancer Hospital and Solove Research Institute, there is a workspace intended to help bring innovative ideas to life. In fact, it is called the Innovation Studio. It’s mission—to use collaboration to solve health care issues. Chief innovation officer, Tim Raderstorf, conceived the idea for the studio.

The portable setup includes 3D printers, laser cutters and a multitude of hand tools. There is also assistance available in product design and pitch development. The studio will remain in the James until the end of July, but will also visit the College of Nursing and Thompson Library.

Innovation Studio also provides two more critical elements—funding and validation. Teams working in the studio can enter competitions in which top collaborations get funding to continue to develop their ideas.