Buckeyes Honor Veterans with Flag Retirement and Replacement Ceremony

The Buckeyes have created a new annual activity in which they retire and replace American flags all across the Columbus campus of the Ohio State University.

The week long celebration of military students, faculty and support staff began with the inaugural Campus Flag Event at the beautiful Remembrance Park. Midshipmen, cadets and student veterans marched in military style to each flag location to retire and replace each flag.

Congressman Steve Stivers, Ohio National Guard Adjutant General Maj. Gen. Mark Bartman and President Michael V. Drake all spoke at the ceremony at Remembrance Park to begin the event. They all spoke on the same topic: the important role veterans play at the Ohio State University.

The Ohio State University counts among its students almost 2,000 vets, active duty, reserves and National Guard members and their dependents. 1,400 vets are either current faculty or staff. Additionally, there are about 400 Air Force, Army or Navy ROTC members on campus.

“Script Ohio” Gets Its Own Monument at OSU

Script Ohio. It’s a standout among the most notable conventions in school sports. Presently a monstrous, rock statue to respect that convention has been divulged at The Ohio State University.

The 20,000-pound landmark lays on the edge of Buckeye Grove, south of Ohio Stadium. Its area is neighboring the fields where the marching band trains.

The statue stands 8 feet tall and 14 feet wide and is purposely missing a spot where the ‘I’ should rest.

It’s presumable the new statue will turn into a favored area for selfies. Students said they as of now snapped a photo of himself behind Script Ohio. Financing for the model originated from the offer of stadium seat pads.

Ohio Staters were helped by the college’s Office of Facilities Operations and Development. Venture chief Karin Murillo-Kirlangitis helped direct the undertaking from plan to development and worked with Ohio Staters and Columbus Art Memorial to assemble the landmark.

Playing in the Dirt: New Research Reveals Much About Soil and Climate Change

New research from the Ohio State University developed a new understanding about microbes and viruses in Sweden’s thawing permafrost. This new information may help scientists predict that speed at which climate change will occur.

The major players are the microbes whose control over climate change is based on their consumption or production of methane. The new set of studies from Buckeye scientists increased our understanding of these microbes.

Many of these bacterial consumers, as the study calls them, and the viruses that interact with them have never-before even been identified. While it was known to scientists that thawing permafrost would release methane, they didn’t know much about specifics of the process, nor how microbial colonies contribute to the process.

Researchers stated that as the world becomes more warm, and more wet we will need to be able to predict who things will change. So, we need to know how this microbes work. They also stated, generally speaking, knowing more about what is going on in the soil can only be a good thing.

The research was published in Nature, Nature Microbiology and ISME Journal.

Buckeye Researchers Find Trend in Obits of People Who Live Longer Lives

Researchers at the Ohio State University conducted a multi-part nationwide study on obituaries and found that people with religious affiliations live almost four years longer on average than people with no religious ties. The study looked at over 1,000 obituaries from all over the country. The study accounted for material status and sex, two factors already known to heavily affect lifespan.

Researchers found that one cause behind the longevity boost of religious affiliation is that many religious persons are also a part of other social and volunteer organizations. Previous studies had already linked these social affiliations to longer lifespans, so making the connection was not difficult. Additionally, the study found that the effects of religion on lifespan could also be linked to the “average religiosity” of where people live and the “personality” of that place.

As previously stated, there have been many studies that have shown that people who are a part of social or volunteer groups live longer than their peers who don’t—when combined with the other data about religious affiliations researchers found there was still something missing from the equation.

Researchers determined that one factor might be morality rules about sex and substance use in religions. These probably have a similar positive effect on longevity. In addition, stress relieving practices such as meditation, prayer, or gratitude are probably a factor.

The study is available online in the journal Social Psychological and Personality Science.

How New Mothers Affect the Quality of New Father’s Parenting

The reactions of new mothers to the father’s interactions with their baby in the early stages of the relationship could have an effect on that father’s parenting quality, according to a new study by OSU researchers. They found that fathers didn’t do as well in their parenting to 9-month-old kids if dads felt mom has been critical of their parenting abilities earlier on.

The study looked at higher income, educated couples who both had careers. Researchers are referring to this affect as maternal gatekeeping. This is due to the fact that in our society moms still have the most respect and control in the sphere of child rearing, according to researchers.

One way researchers measured maternal gatekeeping’s affect was by having dads report how often mom took control of a child rearing task because mom thought the job wasn’t being done well or correctly. Researchers suggested that mom needs to encourage dad by inviting him to do tasks like bathing and letting him know he has done a good job.

The study appears online in the Journal of Child and Family Studies.