How The Zebra Fish Gets Its Stripes

A standout amongst the most noteworthy things about the famous yellow and blue stripes of zebrafish is that they dependably show up by any stretch of the imagination.

Zebrafish start life as straightforward incipient organisms, with three sorts of shade cells on their skin. As they build up, the color cells by one means or another figure out how to sort out themselves nearly without fall flat into the stripes we as a whole know.

Presently specialists have built up a scientific model that may clarify the key part that one of those shade cells plays in ensuring each stripe winds up precisely where it has a place on the fish.

This new model recommends that one of the shade cell composes – called iridophores – drives the procedure of cell association. These cells give redundancies in the cell communication process that guarantees that on the off chance that one collaboration comes up short, another can assume control.

The outcome is that zebrafish get their stripes, notwithstanding when a portion of the cell forms turn out badly

The Endangered, Endangered Species Act Is Supported by Majority of Americans, According to New Study

While media coverage of the Endangered Species Act and the threat of its extinction may make it seem like everyday people in America must no longer support it, a new study by Ohio State University researchers seems to suggest otherwise: everyday Americans are, for the most part, for the act.

The new survey, published in Conservation Letters, finds that 4/5ths of Americans support the act and only 1 out of 10 oppose it. The survey was taken by 1,287 Americans.
Additionally, what the survey found may come as a surprise. Even within 8 special interest groups, such as property-rights advocates and hunters, researchers found the groups were all 68% supportive of the ESA. Support was also consistent throughout varied regions U.S..

Furthermore, the study found that throughout the political party spectrum Americans  supportive of the ESA were well within the majority: 90% of liberals supported it; 77% of moderates; and 74% of conservatives.

Even within the community that demonstrated the highest rate of opposition, property rights advocates, the opposition came in three points shy of a quarter of the community at 21% in opposition.

Buckeye Researchers Found Out How to Make Old Favorites Novel Again

If you’ve become bored of one of your favorite things, researchers at the Ohio State University might have some suggestions on how to introduce some novelty back into your favorite things. What they found was that whatever the activity or object was—popcorn, videos, even water—when consumed in an unconventional way, the consumer enjoyed them more.

The study suggested that when a subject consumed something via an unconventional method they were more easily able to focus on what it was that they loved about it in the first place. This phenomenon has already been employed in “pitch black” restaurants. These popular eateries serve dinner in the dark.

The researchers conducted multiple experiments. In a study of 68 participants, subjects came to a lab thinking they were there for a study on how to help people eat more slowly. Some of the subjects ate 10 pieces of popcorn using just hands; the others ate the pieces with chopsticks. Subjects then rated their experience in a variety of ways. Some of the measures were overall enjoyment, how much flavor the popcorn had and how much fun they had eating it. Participants using the chopsticks later said they enjoyed eating the popcorn more than the subjects who used their hands.

The research was published online at the Personality and Social Psychology Bulletin.

Buckeye Researchers Find Trend in Obits of People Who Live Longer Lives

Researchers at the Ohio State University conducted a multi-part nationwide study on obituaries and found that people with religious affiliations live almost four years longer on average than people with no religious ties. The study looked at over 1,000 obituaries from all over the country. The study accounted for material status and sex, two factors already known to heavily affect lifespan.

Researchers found that one cause behind the longevity boost of religious affiliation is that many religious persons are also a part of other social and volunteer organizations. Previous studies had already linked these social affiliations to longer lifespans, so making the connection was not difficult. Additionally, the study found that the effects of religion on lifespan could also be linked to the “average religiosity” of where people live and the “personality” of that place.

As previously stated, there have been many studies that have shown that people who are a part of social or volunteer groups live longer than their peers who don’t—when combined with the other data about religious affiliations researchers found there was still something missing from the equation.

Researchers determined that one factor might be morality rules about sex and substance use in religions. These probably have a similar positive effect on longevity. In addition, stress relieving practices such as meditation, prayer, or gratitude are probably a factor.

The study is available online in the journal Social Psychological and Personality Science.

How New Mothers Affect the Quality of New Father’s Parenting

The reactions of new mothers to the father’s interactions with their baby in the early stages of the relationship could have an effect on that father’s parenting quality, according to a new study by OSU researchers. They found that fathers didn’t do as well in their parenting to 9-month-old kids if dads felt mom has been critical of their parenting abilities earlier on.

The study looked at higher income, educated couples who both had careers. Researchers are referring to this affect as maternal gatekeeping. This is due to the fact that in our society moms still have the most respect and control in the sphere of child rearing, according to researchers.

One way researchers measured maternal gatekeeping’s affect was by having dads report how often mom took control of a child rearing task because mom thought the job wasn’t being done well or correctly. Researchers suggested that mom needs to encourage dad by inviting him to do tasks like bathing and letting him know he has done a good job.

The study appears online in the Journal of Child and Family Studies.