Students with Intellectual Disabilities Not Spending Enough Time in Gen Ed?

In 1975 a national law was created that required students with intellectual disabilities spend as much time as is possible in gen. ed. courses. A new study by OSU researchers has found that progress in that regard has come to a standstill. No other study has examined nation-wide patterns in placement for students with these disabilities for the entire life span of the law, some 40 years.

In this time, 55-73% of students with intellectual disabilities spend nearly their whole day in specialized schools or classrooms instead of with their non-disabled peers.

Researchers used multiple data sources to find out how students between the ages of 6-21 where placed in each federally-reported educational system between 1976 and 2014.
One possibility might be that inclusion has stalled because most students are already placed in the least restrictive educational environment possible, as per the federal law. However, data from multiple states suggests that the issue could be a lack of standardization among school systems on what constitutes the “least restrictive education environment”.

The study will be published in the American Journal on Intellectual Developmental Disabilities.

Do Bacteria Get Sick? If So, What Does That Mean?

Buckeye researchers are diving into new worlds, observing the interplay between bacteria and the viruses (also known as phages) that infect them. Their study was published in The ISME Journal.

Whether it’s a body of water or a human body, viruses and bacteria interact inside these bodies and influence everything from world oxygen levels to if a new born will get sick. Knowing the secrets of these interactions could help future researchers figure out how to fight disease and save the planet. For the study, the researchers used some very special equipment in league with the US Dept. of Energy.

It allowed them a real-time look at what was going on when two of the same bacteria where given the same or different viruses or phages. They then could analyze, step by step, what was happening.

Researchers say it is not yet clear exactly where their observations and work will lead, but they hope it’ll reveal ways to improve the health of humans and the world we live in. Researchers pointed out that looking beyond what they called “ideal” interactions between viruses and bacteria—a more well-rounded knowledge is needed to move forward.

Could Good Grades Hurt Women Entering the Job Market?

According to new OSU research it turns out that for women new to the job market having gotten good grades in college could do more harm than good when entering the job market. It found that some employers might value a woman’s perceived likability over her intelligence.

Men with high GPAs were two times as likely to be called back by an employer as women with the same GPA and comparable experience and background new Buckeye sponsored study found.

This problem was even worse in some fields. Female math majors were called back at a rate of three times less than their comparable male peers.

A survey in the research found that in a pool of 261 employers they valued competence and commitment when it came to potential male employees. When it came to women they preferred who did “OK”, but did not excel academically.

 

Vet Care Accounts for Billions in Ohio’s Economy OSU Study Finds

Veterinary medicine contributes $13 billion annually in direct and supporting services to Ohio’s economy, according to a recent economic study. The findings are from a 2017 analysis by Regionomics, LLC, which researched veterinary medicine’s impact in economic activity and employment contributions to the Buckeye State.

The study, a collaborative effort between the Ohio Veterinary Medical Association (OVMA) and The Ohio State University College of Veterinary Medicine (CVM), found that veterinary services in Ohio contribute $2.4 billion in direct economic output while sustaining more than 23,000 jobs. Support of animal-related industries, including agricultural production, reflects an additional $10.6 billion in annual economic activity.

Veterinarians work in a variety of disciplines impacting economic growth and job creation beyond caring for companion animals. Areas not often considered as part of the veterinary field include food animal production, zoos, racetracks, health research, education and animal nutrition. The economic study not only reaffirmed the importance of veterinary medicine’s role in supporting the economic activity of these industries, but it also explored issues of veterinary geographic distribution, veterinary student loan debt and the contributions of the human-animal bond in mitigating human health care costs.

OSU Continues Study That Focuses on At-Risk Youth

Research from The Ohio State University’s Kirwan Institute for the Study of Race and Ethnicity is helping the Columbus City Council fund new programs to aid vulnerable youth.

Kirwan Institute Senior Legal Analyst Kyle Strickland presented the findings of the report Renewing Our Call to Action at a hearing in City Hall Monday night. Columbus City Councilman Shannon Hardin hosted the hearing to present the research and announce $100,000 in funding to support programs that aid the boys and young men identified in the report.

Renewing Our Call to Action is intended to help expand the work of the city’s My Brother’s Keeper Initiative. President Obama launched the program in 2014 to address the persistent challenges faced by boys and young men of color and find ways to help these boys reach their potential.

According to the Kirwan Institute research, 45 percent of the city’s 290,100 youth between the ages of 0 and 24 live in neighborhoods that experience high or very high vulnerability.