Researchers Developing New Drug to Treat Sepsis

OSU researchers have discovered a way to enhance the immune system of patients to help them fight sepsis, an extreme and deadly reaction in bodies fighting infection.

How is this possible? Through the use of nanotechnology, scientists can turn healthy immune donner cells into a drug that has powerful anti-bacterial properties.

Scientists have tried the drug on mice with sepsis. The altered immune cells helped kill bacteria in the major organs and blood stream which drastically raised survival rates in the mice.

The focus of the work is to treat late-stage sepsis. During this stage the immune system is compromised to the point where it cannot clear invading bacteria on its own. The researchers are working with specialists who treat sepsis to more rapidly develop the drug for widespread use.

Researchers were quick to point out that sepsis is the leading cause of death in hospitals and there have not been any development in treating the later stages of the immune condition in a long time.

Electric Bandages Defeat Infection, New Study Finds

Medical science has known for years that bandages with electrical currents running through them can heal wounds faster than regular bandages or even antibiotics, but no one knew why. However, recent research at OSU is giving us new insight about why this is true and the findings have the potential to lead to advanced wound treating science.

Bandages such as these will belong in a subsection of therapy known as electroceuticals. As one expects, this simply means using electrical impulses to treat medical problems.
Published in the journal called Scientific Reports, the study is the first of its kind. Though the technology has been around since about 2013, it is only now we are starting to understand why electroceutical bandages kill bacteria around a wound, causing faster healing.

Small communities of microorganisms, biofilms (which can include bacteria), live on skin and on the surface of wounds. These biofilms use extracellular polymeric substances to protect themselves; these are fats and proteins that create a protective barrier for the colony that protect if from something like antibiotics. Traditional methods of healing do little to defeat these colonies around wounds, preventing healing.

The outcome of the study demonstrated that electroceutical bandages, when made from the correct materials, destroy these EPS films that protect the bacterial colonies.

Medical science has known for years that bandages with electrical currents running through them can heal wounds faster than regular bandages or even antibiotics, but no one knew why. However, recent research at OSU is giving us new insight about why this is true and the findings have the potential to lead to advanced wound treating science.
Bandages such as these will belong in a subsection of therapy known as electroceuticals. As one expects, this simply means using electrical impulses to treat medical problems.
Published in the journal called Scientific Reports, the study is the first of its kind. Though the technology has been around since about 2013, it is only now we are starting to understand why electroceutical bandages kill bacteria around a wound, causing faster healing.
Small communities of microorganisms, biofilms (which can include bacteria), live on skin and on the surface of wounds. These biofilms use extracellular polymeric substances to protect themselves; these are fats and proteins that create a protective barrier for the colony that protect if from something like antibiotics. Traditional methods of healing do little to defeat these colonies around wounds, preventing healing.
The outcome of the study demonstrated that electroceutical bandages, when made from the correct materials, destroy these EPS films that protect the bacterial colonies.

Pizza ATM Opens on Campus at OSU

An innovative Pizza ATM is the most recent eating alternative for understudies at The Ohio State University.

The new Pizza ATM is situated on the second floor of Morrill Tower and is open from 11 a.m. to 8 p.m. for understudy dinner plan holders and 11 a.m. to 4 p.m. for general use.

Here’s the means by which it works: Pizzas are pre-made in a neighboring kitchen and accompany cheddar or pepperoni garnishes. They are then put away in a refrigeration unit inside the Pizza ATM. Additional garnish alternatives are normal later on.

At the point when a pizza is requested, it consequently moves to the ATM’s inward broiler and is prepared until the hull is fresh and the cheddar is softened. It normally takes around three to four minutes. A 10-inch pizza costs $8.

OSU Engineers Discover Clean Fossil Fuel Solution

Engineers at The Ohio State University are developing technologies that have the potential to economically convert fossil fuels and biomass into useful products including electricity without emitting carbon dioxide to the atmosphere.

In the first of two papers published in the journal Energy & Environmental Science, the engineers report that they’ve devised a process that transforms shale gas into products such as methanol and gasoline—all while consuming carbon dioxide. This process can also be applied to coal and biomass to produce useful products.

Under certain conditions, the technology consumes all the carbon dioxide it produces plus additional carbon dioxide from an outside source.

Finally, the same team has discovered and patented a way with the potential to lower the capital costs in producing a fuel gas called synthesis gas, or “syngas,” by about 50 percent over the traditional technology. The technology, known as chemical looping, uses metal oxide particles in high-pressure reactors to “burn” fossil fuels and biomass without the presence of oxygen in the air. The metal oxide provides the oxygen for the reaction.

Chemical looping is capable of acting as a stopgap technology that can provide clean electricity until renewable energies such as solar and wind become both widely available and affordable, the engineers said.

Another advancement involves the engineers’ development of chemical looping for production of syngas, which in turn provides the building blocks for a host of other useful products including ammonia, plastics or even carbon fibers.

This is where the technology really gets interesting: It provides a potential industrial use for carbon dioxide as a raw material for producing useful, everyday products.

Marching, Music, Travel

Next fall, the Ohio State University Marching Band will take is incredible field performance all the way to London. They NFL have invited them to play a pregame show for Buffalo Bills/Jacksonville Jaguars series of games that will be part of the National Football Leagues “NFL International Series.

The Ohio State University Marching Band has regularly played for Ohio’s NFL teams and has been invited to international sporting events in the past; however, this is the first time scheduling allowed international travel to be an option. The performance is a first for the NFL International Series, as well.

Using technology to enhance not only performances, but rehearsals has become a hallmark of “The Best Damn Band in the Land”. One such innovation includes learning drills on iPads, while other innovations include floating formations, measure-step marching and script writing—which originated with the famous Script Ohio formation.

Everyone in the band is ecstatic and thrilled about the opportunity to travel to London, said head drum major Nathan MacMaster, a graduate student from Reynoldsburg, Ohio.

Ohio State’s marching band is one of a few collegiate all brass and percussion bands in the United States, and with 225 members, is commonly acknowledged as the largest of its type in the world.

The NFL will cover all of the band’s travel costs for the London trip.